Friday, May 22, 2020

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut Essay - 821 Words

In an interview on Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut states, â€Å"I worked as a miner of corpses, breaking into cellars where over a hundred thousand Hansel and Gretels were baked like gingerbread men† (â€Å"Vonnegut†). Vonnegut Jr. (1922-2007), born during the Modern Age, wrote his first story in 1947, known as the Contemporary Period. The Modern Age was different from the Contemporary Period because of its focus on art while trying to connect with traditions in the world due to their desire to have a connection with a person or idea emotionally. The period after in literature, also called Post-Modernism, uses metaphors and symbols to emphasize the use of intrusions and was known for its breaking of tone, tendency to interrupt point of view, and†¦show more content†¦The critical work of Beaird Glover, Slaughterhouse Five, writes about Vonnegut’s literature and the religious aspect that Vonnegut takes. Glover talks about the experimental writing and progress in the evolution of literature. Vonnegut uses truth and humor by describing the holocaust and the Allies to readers in order to help them understand by imagery. Vonnegut has the ability to implant suggestions and ideas into the minds of the readers by his uses of words. Also, he uses Biblical situations which impresses Glover; introducing the concept of Christianity and kindness into the minds of people. The critic points out the fact that Vonnegut does not take all matters seriously and is very humorous with his writings. Other critics tend to see Vonnegut as not being highly acclaimed or not accepting to the academic canon. Lastly, Glover points out the fact that Vonnegut uses time travel to help create imagery into foreshadowing and creativeness. Vonnegut is an effective writer and makes an impression on numerous literary fanatics. At first, many readers did not like Vonnegut’s writing for its solemn tone and its Postmodernist ideas. Lastly, I agree with Vonneg ut’s religious views in his writings and ideas of spreading Christianity. During the time period, many people â€Å"established him [Vonnegut] as being the best fiction writers of his era† (Glover). It is important because without this,Show MoreRelatedSlaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut534 Words   |  2 PagesSome people may think the novel Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut is a failure. In fact, Kurt Vonnegut himself calls it a failure. A lot of people disagree with that, many think that Slaughterhouse Five is one of Vonneguts best novels. They say it is the most successful book they have ever read, just for reasons of the author himself. From him being bluntly honest, to his great wit. So if it is such a failure in his eyes, why did he write it, what was his purpose, and why was it even publishedRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five By Kurt Vonnegut1458 Words   |  6 PagesThroughout the novel Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut Barry Sadler singer of the song Ballad of the Green Beret and novelist Kurt Vonnegut maintain comparable tones regarding their literature pieces representing the war and the underlying image that is portrayed by the Green Beret. Sadler insightfully states that the impacts that committed soldiers fought through and the sacrifices their families had endured: represents honor, courage, and is described as jingoistic. It is an exceptionallyRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut1560 Words   |  7 Pages Slaughterhouse-five strives to remember the tragedy of the bombing of Dresden. Kurt Vonnegut constructs his novel around a main character who becomes â€Å"unstuck in time† (23). Billy Pilgrim’s life is told out of order, which gives him a different perspective than the rest of the world. Billy lives through his memories, and revisits events in his life at random times and without warning. Vonnegut introduces Billy Pilgrim to the Tralfamadorian way of thinking about memory and time so that he can copeRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five By Kurt Vonnegut1997 Words   |  8 PagesKurt Vonnegut’s book, Slaughterhouse-Five, is full of historical context, scientific-fiction themes, modernistic themes, and even emphasizes the idea of free will. But Vonnegut’s novel contains one major theme of the destructiveness of war making the book anti-war. Vonnegut uses a variety of techniques to allude to this theme and he does it well. The combination of his writing style and his use of humor to degrade the human in the event of war is highly effective in the fact that it causes the readerRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five By Kurt Vonnegut1348 Words   |  6 PagesSince the last time I wrote a journal, I started and finished Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five and started Neal Stephenson’s Seveneves. Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five had a total of 275 pages, and Neal Stephenson’s Seveneves has a total of 854 pages, however, I am currently on page 50. Slaughterhouse-Five is a piece of historical fiction that explores the hardships of war, the odd simplicity of death, and the confusing topic of time. The novel stars Billy Pilgrim, a physically weak and strangeRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five By Kurt Vonnegut3749 Words   |  15 PagesMario Peà ±a Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut â€Å" ‘Is it an anti-war book?’ ‘Yes,’ I said. ‘I guess.’ ‘You know what I say to people when I hear they’re writing anti-war books?’ ‘No. What do you say, Harrison Starr?’ ‘I say, ‘Why don’t you write an anti-glacier book instead?’† (Vonnegut 4). 1. The author Kurt Vonnegut and a filmmaker, Harrison Starr, converse in this passage, which introduces the topic of Slaughterhouse-Five. In which Starr makes fun of Vonnegut’s idea for planning on making Slaughterhouse-FiveRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five By Kurt Vonnegut1242 Words   |  5 PagesSlaughterhouse Five, a novel written by Kurt Vonnegut, depicts unchronological and sometimes nonsensical moments of the life of Billy Pilgrim as he â€Å"become[s] unstuck in time†(Vonnegut S. Five 23) Billy has no control over where he will end up next. â€Å"He has seen his birth and death many times, and he pays random visits to all the events in between†, and â€Å"is in a constant state of fright, ... because he never knows which part of his life he is going to have to act out next.†(Vonnegut S. Five 23)Read MoreSlaughterhouse Five, By Kurt Vonnegut941 Words   |  4 Pageslargely fatal events, the survivors reflect upon the unbearable guilt and emotions they have experienced. Billy Pilgrim, the main protagonist In Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Slaughterhouse-Five, serves as Vonnegut’s vehicle to communicate his feelings and contemplations as a survivor. Throughout the story, Pilgrim, or the reader encounters an animal that Vonnegut uses to convey the range of emotions and incidents that humans are subject to as a result of war. In the novel, a mysterious dog resides alongsideRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five By Kurt Vonnegut1154 Words   |  5 PagesTaylor Holmes In the novel Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut presents a framed narrative voiced through an unreliable narrator that stimulates the presence of universal and empirical truths. (Introducton?) The juxtaposition of predestination with the exercise of free will is an age-old question. In the pagan world, prior to the upsurge of Western development and Christianity, predestination was deemed a truth; pagan gods were superlative and dictated the lives and fates of subordinate humans. AroundRead MoreSlaughterhouse Five By Kurt Vonnegut1050 Words   |  5 PagesLauren Farrell Mrs. Worthington AP ELA 4 30 November 2014 Free Will Through his novel, Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut poses an ancient question: Are we masters of our destiny, or are we simply pawns of fate? The medium through which Mr. Vonnegut presents this riddle is death. Death is the central point to which all action in the book connects. The story is primarily about the death of 135,000 German civilians in the bombing of Dresden narrated by Billy Pilgrim, a man who experiences death from

Friday, May 8, 2020

The United States ( Us ) - 2265 Words

The United States (US) is a diverse nation; a product of mass immigration from a variety of nations, race, and cultures. In fact, the US would not exist as it does today without the influx of immigrants coming to its shores for a better life. Many people have described the US as a melting pot, which elicits thoughts of everyone coming together to resemble one another. Rather than having an eclectic mix of different cultures and beliefs, the nation has sought to assimilate most people into a mold that reflects the dominant culture and belief system. However, diverse cultures and people need to feel as if they are accepted and their beliefs and cultures need recognition and inclusion (Petrovich Lowe, 2005). The focus of public education in the US has been one of assimilation, where people let go of their former culture and adopt an entirely new identity (Hickey, 2015; Kaestle Foner, 1983). While education has rested in the hands of individual states, the federal government has pushed a curriculum of assimilation throughout the history of the US (Carroll, 2009). However, many educational experts have determined that assimilationist practices were very alien to a variety of students and were not often beneficial to students who were forced or prodded to assimilate (Kaestle Foner, 1983). Therefore, education for immigrants can be better understood through an investigation of the differing perspectives of assimilation and acculturation. Assimilation has been theShow MoreRelatedThe United States ( Us )2291 Words   |  10 PagesColombia White Paper 1. Strategic Direction 1.1. The United States (US) must continue to expand collaboration efforts across the Americas to support democratic consolidation, deter drug trafficking, counter insurgency and counter organized crime (NSS, 2015). As the current political crisis between the Inspector General and the Bogota Mayor unwinds, it is highly likely that all of these efforts will come into play to keep Colombia on a path toward peace and stability. As such, we must support theRead MoreThe United States : The Rights And Duties For Us Citizens812 Words   |  4 PagesThe United States (US) Constitution establishes the rights and duties for US Citizens and all residents in the country. Regular issues mostly brought before courts are alleged violations of citizens’ rights. To some extent, it is confusing to determine whether a citizen’s constitutional rights have been violated or not; decisions may be appealed simply due to incomprehension. The First Amendment granted freedom of religion, press, speech to every citizen, and established the secular nature of countryRead MoreThe Recession Of The United States ( Us ) With The Subprime Mortgage Crisis1093 Words   |  5 Pages INTRODUCTION The early beginning of the 21st century had marked the history of the United States (US) with the Subprime mortgage crisis. In fact, it started when the traditional model used by the bank to finance mortgages lending trough customer deposits moved to a new model in which they were selling the mortgages to the bond markets through new kind of investment vehicles . This method made it easier to find borrowers because banks were no more limited by a maximum amount of mortgage lendingRead MoreThe United States Census : An Element Of The Us Department Of Commerce1176 Words   |  5 PagesThe US Census dates back to 1790 and is currently headed quartered in Suitland, Md. As of 1942. As an element of the US Department of Commerce the US Census is overseen by the Economics and Statistics administration. The US. Census Staffs over 4,285 members. The goal of the US Census Bureau is to provide the U.S. quality, accurate data that represent demographic truths of the U.S. The US. Census counts t he population every 10 years. The census counts every person who resides in the 50states and USRead MoreRole of the United States Government in the Global Expansion of Us Media Industries1478 Words   |  6 PagesGlobal Expansion of US Media Industries 1 ROLE OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT IN THE GLOBAL EXPANSION OF US MEDIA INDUSTRIES by Lunlalit Niyomtas Student ID : 14060193 Global Media 2MED7H3 Professor Daya Thussu School of Media, Arts and Design University of Westminster Global Expansion of US Media Industries 2 Introduction In the recent past, we cannot deny that the media industry has experienced monumental growth both in terms of revenues and global expansion. Like other businessesRead MoreName Of The Case: Katz V. The United States. 389 Us 3471203 Words   |  5 PagesName of the Case: Katz v. the United States 389 US 347 (1967) Case History: United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit Court in the Southern District of Florida Facts: Katz was caught transmitting gambling information over the phone to clients in other states because the federal agents put an eavesdropping device to the outside of a public phone booth. Based on eavesdropping, Katz was then convicted under an eight-count indictment for the illegal transmission of informationRead MoreIntroduction The trade between the United States (US) and the European Union (EU) is estimated at a1400 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction The trade between the United States (US) and the European Union (EU) is estimated at a value of $750 billion annually (Tehrani, 2008). As both countries have their own specific food safety regulations, there is always going to be a difference of opinion on whose regulation is correct. In 1997, a major difference in opinion became apparent between the US and the EU, where the EU felt that procedures used by the US to decontaminate poultry where not safe (Ã…  koba, 2013). The use of â€Å"hyper-chlorinatedRead More The United States Visitor and Immigration Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) Program3830 Words   |  16 PagesThe United States Visitor and Immigration Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) Program Introduction The United States Visitor and Immigration Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) program was introduced on January 5th, 2004 at all air and sea ports of the United States of America. This program, as outlined by the Department of Homeland Security, aims to increase the level of security in the U.S. while allowing it to remain a multicultural land with people from all parts of the worldRead MoreThe United States Unchecked Immigration From Mexico Poses Two Major Challenges For The Us936 Words   |  4 Pagesdispersed throughout the US unlike Mexicans who congregate in ethnic ghettos, and finally, they had no historic claim to American territory like Mexicans do (Huntington, 2009, para. 25). Furthermore, Huntington (2009) argues that unchecked immigration from Mexico poses two major challenges for the US. First, it is changing the nature of the citizenry by turning the country bilingual and bicultural as more Hispanic enclaves sprout up, particularly in the South and Southwestern US (para. 16). Second, thisRead MoreAccounting Standards And Its Effect On Us Countries Globally By Using The United States Alone As An Example1162 Words   |  5 Pagesbe affected in a negative way. The best way to make this happen is by adopting the same set of standards across the globe and stick by them. This paper will show how the adoption of these standards will benefit countries globally by using the United States alone as an example. As a matter of fact, the effects on U.S. reporting practices are likely to be limited. Nonetheless, there could be a significant impact accounting reporting processes and systems. Therefore our focus will be on the costs to

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Azzzz Free Essays

Caribbean Tourism Legislation Database CONTENTS Pages INTRODUCTION †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ 2-3 Background and Purpose Content Structure How to Use the Database Acknowledgments I. COUNTRY-BY-COUNTRY LISTING †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ 4-31 II. LISTING BY SUBJECT AREA †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ 32-51 1. We will write a custom essay sample on Azzzz or any similar topic only for you Order Now Institutional Framework of Tourism 2. Tourist Accommodation Establishments 3. Development Incentives 4. Regulation and Control of Tourism Industry 5. Tourism Taxation 6. Tourism and Environment 7. Travel/Tours, Sports, Entertainment . Air and Sea Transport 9. Casinos/Gaming INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This Caribbean Tourism Legislation Database is intended primarily as a service to CTO members, although clearly it will also be of assistance to the numerous academic institutions and individual researchers who make use of the Organization’s Documentation Centre. It is meant to serve as a ready and easy-to-use reference source on regional tourism legislation available at CTO Headquarters for consultation. The need to compile such a database arose from CTO’s ongoing work programme activities, notably in the area of product development, and the increasing requests for examples of tourism-related legislative enactments made by member countries in recent times. CONTENT The present first edition of the database contains 187 pieces of tourism-related legislation from 20 member countries. It is not a complete coverage of all CTO member countries; nor is it a full compendium of tourism legislation in the Caribbean. But it is perhaps the largest collection of its kind and, to that extent, it is also a unique resource. More importantly, this first edition represents the beginning of an ongoing process of collection and systematic and user-friendly compilation of tourism legislation. Thus, the database will expand as more items are incorporated into it. Regular updates of this publication will inform members and other users. In its present initial form the database is in a document rather than a database format. It does however lend itself easily for inclusion in due course in the CTO Database System, which is currently under preparation. STRUCTURE The database has been structured with a view to providing a quick and easy overview of its contents. It comprises two main listings. The first listing presents all legislation by country in alphabetical order. Here entries are given with full details and a brief annotation. The following is a typical example: The Anguilla Tourist Board Ordinance, 1993. (No. 16 of 1993) An Ordinance to provide for the establishment of a statutory authority known as the Anguilla Tourist Board for the encouragement, promotion and development of tourist traffic to Anguilla, for adequate and efficient tourist services for Anguilla and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. The second main listing regroups and classifies the available items under nine different subject areas. These subject areas are the following: 1)Institutional Framework of Tourism 2)Tourist Accommodation Establishments 3)Development Incentives 4)Regulation and Control of Tourism Industry 5)Tourism Taxation 6)Tourism and Environment 7)Travel/Tours, Sports, Entertainment 8)Air and Sea Transport 9)Casinos/Gaming. Items under this subject listing are again presented by country in alphabetical order. Entries under this listing are abbreviated. For example, under â€Å"Institutional Framework of Tourism† and under Anguilla, the above item is shown as follows. The Anguilla Tourist Board Ordinance, 1993. (No. 16 of 1993) Due to the close affinity between certain subject areas, on the one hand, and the multi-purpose nature of certain legislative items, on the other hand, a certain amount of overlap and duplication of entries occurs under these subject area listings. As the database grows, it may well lend itself to further subject area classification and, if necessary, overall restructuring in the future. HOW TO USE THE DATABASE It is clear from the above outline of the structure and organisation of the database that use of it is fairly easy. Depending on what one may be looking for, one may refer to either the main country-by-country listing, or the appropriate subject area. A certain amount of cross-referring may also be necessary and useful. The required item(s) may then be consulted at the CTO Documentation Centre or copies may be forwarded to members. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS CTO wishes to thank those member countries that have made available copies of tourism-related legislation for the purpose of this database. The assistance of Ms Heather Waithe, CTO Library Officer, in assembling the various items and compiling the database is gratefully acknowledged. JOHN YACOUMIS PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT ADVISER REGIONAL TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FUNDED BY THE EUROPEAN UNION I. COUNTRY-BY-COUNTRY LISTING ANGUILLA 1)Accommodation Tax Ordinance, 1973. (No7 of 1973) An Ordinance to levy a tax on the amounts payable by visitors for accommodation and meals in Anguilla and matters incidental thereto. 2)The Accommodation Tax (Amendment) Ordinance, 1985. (No. 1 of 1985) )The Anguilla Tourist Board Ordinance, 1993. (No. 16 of 1993) An Ordinance to provide for the establishment of a statutory authority known as the Anguilla Tourist Board for the encouragement, promotion and development of tourist traffic to Anguilla, for adequate and efficient tourist services for Anguilla and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. ARUBA National Ordinance of November 26, 1953 for the Promotion of Industrial Establishments and Hotel Construction (Publication Sheet 1953 No. 194) as amended BAHAMAS 1) The Promotion of Tourism Act, No. 49 of 1963. Chapter 13. Revised Edition 1965. An Act to provide means for increasing and developing facilities for tourism and to promote measures for attracting tourists to the colony. 2) The Hotels Encouragement Act, 1954, with subsequent amendments. Chapter 304. An Act to encourage the construction of hotels in the colony by providing for the refund of customs duties and emergency taxes and certain other concessions, and for the exemption of such hotels from certain taxation, and to relieve existing hotels from certain taxation. 3)The Hotels Encouragement (Amendment) Act, 1965. No. 59 of 1965. An Act to further amend the Hotels Encouragement Act, Ch. 341. 4) The Hotels Encouragement (Amendment) Act. No. 5 of 1966. An Act to further amend the Hotels Encouragement Act, Ch. 341. 5) The Hotels Act, 1970. An Act to make provision for the licensing of and the regulation and improvement of standards in hotels; for the imposition of an hotel guest tax; and for matters connected with or incidental to those purposes. 6)The Hotels Encouragement Regulations, 1971. Supplement. 7) The Hotels Regulations, 1971. S. I. No. 8 of 1971. Issued under the Hotels Act, 1970. 8)The Water Skiing and Motor Boat Control Act, 1970. No. 16 of 1970. An Act for the more effective control of Water Skiing and the Driving of Motor Boats in coastal waters. 9) The Lotteries and Gaming Act, 1969. No. 8 of 1969. An Act to regulate Lotteries and Gaming and for matter connected therewith or incidental thereto. 10) The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1971. No. 1 of 1971. An Act to amend the Lotteries and Gaming Act, 1969. 11)The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1972. No. 2 of 1972. An Act to amend the Lotteries and Gaming Act, 1969. 12)The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1974. No. 13 of 1974. An Act to amend the Lotteries and Gaming Act, 1969. 13) The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1978. No. 3 of 1978. An act to amend the Lotteries and Gaming Act, 1969. 14) Cruise Ships (Overnighting Incentives) Act, 1995. An Act to make provision for the grant of concessions for the purpose of encouraging the development of tourism in The Bahamas, and for related matters. 15)The Hotel Corporation of the Bahamas Act, 1974. No. 20 of 1974. An Act to provide for the establishment of The Hotel Corporation of the Bahamas, for the functions of the Corporation and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. BARBADOS 1) Barbados Tourism Authority Act, 1993 (No. 1 of 1993) An Act to provide for the establishment of the Barbados Tourism Authority and the Tourism Advisory Council and for related matters. 2)Barbados Tourism Authority Act, 1995. (No. 15 of 1995) An Act to revise the Barbados Tourism Authority Act, 1993. 3)Hotels, Apartments and Guest Houses (Registration and Classification) Regulations, 1982. S. I. 1982 No. 160. Made under section 12 of the Barbados Board of Tourism Act, Ch. 342. 4)Hotel Aids Act, 1967. Ch. 72. An Act to consolidate and revise the law relating to the encouragement of the development of hotels and for matters incidental thereto and connected therewith. 5) Suggested Minimum Requirements for Granting of Concessions to Hotels/Guesthouses. Issued by the National Development Corporation under the Hotel Aids Act. Hotel Proprietors Act, 1975. Ch. 309. An Act to regulate the liability of Hotel Proprietors for loss of or damage to property brought by guests to hotels and to provide for related matters. ) Hotel and Restaurants (Sales Tax) Act, 1974. An Act to provide for the imposition of tax on the proceeds of the letting of hotel accommodation and sale of food and beverages in hotels and restaurants and for commercial purposes. 8)The Hotel and Restaurants (Rate of Tax) Order, 1977. Made under section 4 of the Hotels and Restaurants (Sales Tax) Act, 1974. Hotels and Restaurants (Sales Tax) Amendment Act, 1978. An Act to amend the Hotels and Restaurants (Sales Tax) Act, 1974. Hotels and Restaurants (Sales Tax) (Amendment Act), 1980. An Act to amend the Hotels and Restaurants (Sales Tax) Act Health Services Act, 1969. Ch. 44. An Act relating to the promotion and preservation of the health of the inhabitants of Barbados. Subsidiary legislation shown under 12 to 19 made under section 10 of this principal Act. 12)Health Services (Food Hygiene) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 13)Health Services (Hotels) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 14)Health Services (Restaurants) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. Health Services (Building) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. Health Services (Lodging Houses and Barracks) Regulations, 1970. Ch. 44. Health Services (Swimming Pools) Regulations, 1970. Ch. 44. Health Services (Amendment) Act, 1995-4. Minor Offences Act, 1998-1. An Act to revise the law in relation to certain minor offences. Deals inter alia with harassment. National Conservation Commission Act, 1982. Ch. 393. An Act to revise and consolidate the law relating to public parks, beaches and caves and related matters and to make provision for the conservation of sites and buildings of national interest. Travel Services Act, 1983. Ch. 373A. An Act to provide for the registration and control of persons providing travel services and for related matters. Travel Services (Fees) Order, 1983. Ch. 373A. Issued under the Travel Services Act of 1983. Travel Services Regulations, 1983. Made under section 27 of the Travel Services Act, 1983. Deals with the licensing and registration of travel agents and tour operators Barbados Port Authority (Water Sports) Regulations, 1990 Made under the Barbados Port Authority Act, Ch. 285B. Deals with registration, inspection, licensing, insurance, safety and related issues. Condominium Act, 1971. Ch. 224A. An Act to facilitate the division of properties into parts that are to be owned individually and parts that are to be owned in common and to provide for the use and management of such properties. Road Traffic (Amendment) Regulations, 1990. S. I. 1990 No. 128. Made under section 124(1) of the Road Traffic Act. Ch. 295. Regulates taxi fares. Road Traffic Regulations, 1984. Ch. 295. Parts VIII -IX. Provisions relating to hackney carriages, taxis, maxi-taxis, hired cars and contract carriages. Registration of Business Names Act, 140. Ch.. 317. An Act to provide for the registration of firms and persons carrying on business under business names and for related matters. Incorporates amendments up to 1988. Profession, Trade and Business Registration Act, 1979. Ch. 373. An Act to make provision for the registration of persons exercising or engaging in any profession, trade, business or calling and to provide for related matters. Incorporates amendments up to 1990. Profession, Trade and Business Registration Order, 1992. Made under section 13(a) of the Profession, Trade and Business Registration Act. Beach Protection Act, 1890. Ch. 389. An act to consolidate the Acts relating to the taking and carrying away of sand from certain parts of the beach. Incorporates subsequent amendments, viz. 1958-33, 1958-55, 1966-5, L. N. 168/1967, 1975-18 (REPEALED). Cultivation of Trees Act, 1951. Ch. 390. An Act for promoting the cultivation of trees, and for purposes in connection therewith. Marine Areas (Preservation and Enhancement) Act, 1976. Ch. 392. An Act for the preservation and protection of the marine life in certain submarine areas of Barbados and for the establishment of underwater parks and art centres in connection therewith (REPEALED). Wild Birds Protection Act, 1907. Ch. 398. An Act relating to the protection of certain wild birds. Incorporates miscellaneous amendments, i. e. 1952,1958,1978. L. N. 168/1967. The Civil Aviation (Air Navigation) Regulations, 1984. Made under section 28 of the Civil Aviation Act, 1983. (Act 1983-31) Barbados Port Authority (Tariff Book Of Dues and Charges) Regulations, 1987. Made under section 66 of the Barbados Port Authority Act. (S. I. 1987 No. 166) Barbados Port Authority (Water Sports) Regulations, 1990. S. I. 1990 No. 44. Made under the Barbados Port Authority Act, Ch. 285B. Barbados Investment and Development Corporation Act, 1992. ( No. 30 of 1992) An Act to provide for the establishment of a corporation for the purpose of developing Barbados’ industrial, offshore financial, export and other related activities. 9) Statistics. Chapter 192 An Act to provide for the taking of censuses and for the collection, compilation, analysis and publication of certain statistical information and for other matters relating thereto. 40)Parks and Beaches Commission Act, Chapter 233A. (1970-12) An Act to provide for the control, maintenance and development of the public parks and beaches of Barbados 41) The Parks a nd Beaches Regulations, 1974. Made under the Parks and Beaches Commission Act, 1970. 42) Parks and Beaches Commission (Amendment) Act, (1974-23) An Act to amend the Parks and Beaches Commission Act, 1970. 43) Parks and Beaches Commission (Amendment) Act, (1978-46) An Act to amend the Parks and Beaches Commission Act, 1970. 44) Trees (Preservation) Act. Chapter 397. (December 1981) An Act to provide for the preservation of trees, 1981-49. BELIZE 1)Belize Tourist Board (Tourist Guide) Regulations, 1992. Statutory Instrument No. 130 of 1992. Regulations made by the Belize Tourist Board in exercise of the powers conferred upon it by section 15 of the Belize Tourist Board Act, (No. of 1990) and all other powers thereunto it enabling and approved by the Minister responsible for Tourism. 2)Belize Tourist Board (Tour Guide) Regulations, 1994. Statutory Instrument No. 80 of 1994 Regulations made by the Belize Tourist Board in exercise of the powers conferred upon it by section 15 of the Belize Tourist Board Act, Chapter 232A of the Laws of Belize, Revised Edition 1980-1990, and all other powers thereunto it enabling and approved by th e Minister responsible for Tourism. Repeals S. I. 130/92. 3)Hotels and Tourist Accommodation Act, 1997. No. 12 0f 1997. An Act to make new provisions to regulate the operation and management of hotels; to provide for the regulation of tourist accommodation; to repeal the hotels Act, Chapter 228 of the Laws of Belize, Revised Edition 1980-90; and to provide for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. 4)Hotels and Tourist Accommodation (Minimum Registration, Licensing and Operating Requirements) Regulations, 1999. Regulations made by the Minister of Tourism in exercise of the powers conferred upon him by section 14 as read with section 31 of the Hotels and Tourist Accommodation Act (No. 12 of 1997), and all other powers thereunto him enabling. )1st Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Hotels and Resorts b) 2nd Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Apartments, Condominiums Villas c) 3rd Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Guest Houses, Lodges and Inns d) 4th Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Community Based Tourism Est ablishments e) 5th Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Camp Sites Belize Tourist Board, Agreement for Operating a Liveaboard Passenger Vessel (Class II- Vessels ten (10) and above and above passenger capacity). Belize Tourist Board, Environmental Compliance Plan for Liveaboard Passenger Vessels (Class II). Prepared by: The Department of the Environment in conjunction with The Fisheries Department – Belize Tourist Board. Revised June 1998. *7)Belize Tourist Board (Local Water and Passenger and Watersports Vessels) Regulations,2000 *8)Brochure to facilitate the implementation of the retired persons program under the retired persons (incentives) Act (No. 11 of 1999) *9)Belize Tourist Board (Tour Operators) Regulations, 1999 Regulations made by the Belize Tourist Board in exercise of the powers conferred upon it by section 15 of the Belize Tourist Board Act, Chapter 232A of the Laws of Belize, Revised Edition 1980-90, and all other powers thereunto it enabling *10)Protected Areas Conservation Act, 1995. No. 15 of 1995 An act to establish a trust for the protection, conservation and enhancement of the natural and cultural resources of Belize; to establish a Trust Fund for the Trust; to establish a Board of Directors to control and manage the affairs of the trust; and to provide for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. BERMUDA The Summary Offences Act, 1926. 1926: No. 2 With subsequent amendments up to 1977. Makes provision, inter alia, for restriction on making noises at night, tidiness of public places, beaches, etc, restriction on riding horses on beaches. The Motor Taxi Regulations, 1952 Issued by the Transport Control Department for information of taxi drivers ONLY. These Regulations were brought into operation on 15th January, 1953, by order published in Gazette No. 53 of 1952. The Auxiliary Bicycles Act, 1954 The Hotel (Licensing and Control) Regulations, 1976 Made by the Minister of Tourism under section 14 of the Hotels (Licensing and Control) Act 1969. The Motor Car Act 1951. Parts II and IV. Incorporating subsequent amendments. Deals, inter alia with general restrictions on use of motor cars for hire or reward, public service vehicles including buses, taxis and limousines, etc. BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS 1)Commercial Recreational Vessels Licensing Act, 1992. An Act to provide for the licensing of commercial recreational vessels; to issue permits to non-commercial recreational vessels and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. Tourist Board Ordinance, 1969, Ch. 280 Incorporates subsequent amendments up to 1991. Makes provision for the establishment of the Board, its membership, duties, functions and powers as well as financial provisions. 3)*Chapter 95. Mongoose (Prohibition). 6th October 1902. Mongoose Prohibition Ordinance. 4)*Chapter 96. Pigeons. 19th November, 1926. Pigeons Ordinance. An Ordinance to provide for the establishment and constitution of a Tourist Board and for other matters connected therewith. 5)* Chapter 97. Protection of Animals Act. 20th March 1935. 6)* Chapter 85. Plant Protection Ordinance. 30th October 1941 7)* Chapter 86. Protection of Trees and Conservation of Soil and Water. 4th Septeber1954 8)* Chapter 87. Turtles Ordinance. 21st May 1959 9)* Chapter 98. Wild Birds Protection Ordinance. 9th March 1959 10)* Chapter 208. Beach Protection Ordinance. 13th August 1960 11)* National Parks Ordinance. No. 29 of 1961. 12)* Statutory Rules and Orders. Interpretation and General Clauses Act, 1955. (Leeward Islands No. 12 of 1955). No. 23 of 1966 13)* Statutory Rules and Ord ers. Aircraft (Landing Places and Fees) (Virgin Gorda) Notification 1968. No. 9 of 1968 (Gazetted 27th November 1968) 14)* The Tourist Board Ordinance of 1968. No. 9 of 1968. An Ordinance to provide for the establishment and constitution of a Tourist Board and for other matters connected therewith 15)*Statutory Rules and Orders. Interpretation and General Clauses Act, Section 30, Cap 135. No. 12A of 1968 16)*The Mining Ordinance, 1980. No. 10 of 1980 An Ordinance to repeal the mining Ordinance 1972 and to enact more comprehensive legislation governing the exploration for and production of minerals in the British Virgin Islands, and for purposes incidental thereto or connected therewith 17)*Tourist Board (Amendment) Ordinance, 1972. No. 9 of 1972 An Ordinance to amend the Tourist Board Ordinance, 1968. 8)*Mining Ordinance, 1972. No. 11 of 1972 An Ordinance to make provision with regard to prospecting for minerals and mining, and for purposes connected therewith. 19)*Petroleum Mining Ordinance, 1972. No. 12 of 1972 An Ordinance to make provisions relating to the issue of exploration licence and petroleum agreement with regard to exploration, prospecting and mining for petroleum in Virgin Islands and to provide for matters connected therewith. 20)*Petroleum Mining (Amendment) Ordinance, 1973. No. 8 of 1973 An Ordinance to amend the Petroleum Mining Ordinance, 1972. 21)*Endangered Animals and Plants Ordinance, 1976. No. of 1976 An Ordinance to restrict the importation and exportation of certain animals, plants and articles; to restrict the movement after importation of certain live animals; and for the purposes connected therewith and incidental thereto. 22)*Hotel Aid Ordinance, 1977. No. 25 of 1977 An Ordinance to consolidate the existing law concerning concessions in respect of customs duties and income tax for certain hoteliers within the Territory, to provide for relief from duty on goods imported, to remove certain concessions, to define premises qualifying as hotels and for other purposes connected therewith and incidental thereto. 3)*National Parks (Amendment) Ordinance, 1978. No. 3 of 1978 An Ordinance to Amend the National Park s Ordinance, 1961. 24)*Appropriation Ordinance, 1979. No. 4 of 1979 An Ordinance to provide for the appropriation of diverse sums of money for and towards defraying several charges and expenses for the services of the Government of the Virgin Islands for the year ending on the 31st day of December, 1979. 25)*Marine Parks and Protected Areas Ordinance, 1979. No. 8 of 1979 An Ordinance to make provision for the establishment of Marine Parks and Protected Areas and for purposes connected therewith and incidental thereto. 6)*Fisheries Ordinance, 1979. No. 18 of 1979 An Ordinance to provide for the protection, regulation and control of products of the sea in the waters, of adjacent to, the Virgin Islands, and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. 27)*Sewerage (Rates and Charges) Ordinance, 1980. No. 6 of 1980 An Ordinance to impose sewerage rates and charges in prescribed areas 28)*The Wild Birds Protection (Amendment) Ordinance, 1980. No. 11 of 1980 An Ordinance to amen d the Wild Birds Protection Ordinance, Cap. 98 29)*Fisheries (Amendment) Ordinance, 1980. No. 12 of 1980 An Ordinance to Amend the Fisheries Ordinance of 1979, No. 18 of 1979 30)*The Tourist Board (Amendment) Ordinance, 1983. No. 2 of 1983 An Ordinance to amend the Tourist Board Ordinance, 1968 CAYMAN ISLANDS Tourism Regulations (1999 Revision). Issued under the Tourism Law (1995 Revision). Revised under the Authority of the Law Revision Law (19 of 1975). Consolidated and revised 5th January 1999. Stipulates fess, forms, register of licenses, minimum requirements, specific minimum requirements in respect of the advertising, etc, of locally owned facilities, travelling expenses, hospitality expenses, appeals, etc. The Travel Tax Law, 1976 (Law 11 of 1976) A law to repeal and replace the Travel Tax Law (1 of 1965). Provides for the collection of duties in respect of passengers carried and the responsibilities of carriers. The Travel Tax Regulations, 1977. Made under section 6 of The Travel Tax Law, 1976. Prescribes form of travel tax receipt for issue to travellers, form of monthly account to Collector of Taxes of travel tax collected from travellers and other related forms. The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1979 (Law 32 of 1979) The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1982 (Law 6 of 1982) The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1984 (Law 14 of 1984) The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1985 (Law 39 of 1985) The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1987 (Law 5 of 1987) The Tourist Accommodation (Taxation) Law (Revised) [1978] Consolidated with law 28 of 1968, law 2 of 1977. Deals with taxation of tourist accommodation and related matters. The Tourist Accommodation (Taxation) (Amendment) Law, 1981 (Law 25 of 1981) The Tourism Law, 1974. Law 10 0f 1974 A law to repeal and replace in amended form the Tourist Board Law (No. 38 of 1965). Provides for the establishment of the Department of Tourism, the Tourism Advisory Council and the Hotels Licensing Board, the composition of these bodies and their functions. Tourism Regulations, 1974. Made under section 13 of the Tourism Law, 1974 [Law 10 of 1974]. Prescribes application forms for the licensing of accommodation establishments and lays down minimum requirements. Tourism (Amendment) Regulations , 1985 Made under section 13 of the Tourism Law, 1974 (Law 10 of 1974). The Tourism (Amendment) Law, 1979 (Law 3 of 1979) Strata Titles Registration Law, 1973 (Law 14 of 1973) A Law to facilitate the sub-division of land in strata and the disposition and registration of strata titles and for matters incidental thereto. Strata Titles Registration Regulations, 1974. Made under section 18 of the Strata Titles Registration Law, 1973. The Strata Titles Registration (Amendment) Law, 1983 (Law 1 of 1983) The Mosquito (Research and Control) Law (Revised) [1976] A Law to provide for research and control of mosquitoes. Consolidated with Law 27 of 1968, Law 18 of 1969, Law 5 of 1974 and revised under authority of the Law Revision Law (no 19 of 1975). The Mosquito (Research and Control) Regulations (Revised), 1976 The Mosquito (Research and Control) (Amendment) Regulations, 1979 Made under section 28 of the Mosquito (Research and Control) Law (Revised). Declaration of Physical Control Area (Mosquito (Research and Control) Law (Revised) [1979] The Mosquito (Research and Control) (Amendment) Regulations, 1981 Made under section 28 of the Mosquito (Research and Control) Law (Revised). The Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law 19 of 1978). A Law to preserve the natural amenities of the territorial waters of the islands. The Marine Conservation Regulations, 1979 Made under section 24 of the Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law 19 of 1978) 25) Marine Conservation (Amendment) Regulations, 1980 Made under section 24 of the Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law 19 of 1978) 26) The Marine Conservation (Turtle Protection) Regulations, 1978 Made under section 24 of the Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law 19 of 1978) 27) Marine Conservation (Amendment) Regulations, 1985. Made under section 24 of the Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law 19 of 1978) 8)Marine Conservation (Turtle Protection) (Amendment) Regulations, 1985. 29)The Marine Conservation (Amendment) Law, 1985 (Law 5 of 1985). 30) Marine Conservation (Amendment) Regulations, 1986. Made under section 24 of the Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law 19 of 1978) 31) The Marine Conservation (Marine Parks) Regulations, 1986 Made under the Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law No. 19 of 1978). 32) The Marine Conservation (Marine Parks) (Amendment) Regulations , 1986. Made under the Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law No. 9 of 1978). 33) Marine Conservation (Licensing of Seine Nets) Directives, 1986. Issued by the Marine Conservation Board under sections 3 and 4 of the Marine Conservation Law, 1978. 34) Marine Conservation (Licensing of Spear Guns) Directives, 1986. Issued by the Marine Conservation Board under sections 3 an4 of the Marine Conservation Law, 1978. 35) The Litter Law, 1982 (Law 2 of 1982) A law respecting the littering of public places and of premises. 36) Hotel Aid Law, 1976 (Law 6 of 1976). The Hotels Aid Law, Ch. 6, having fallen into abeyance, it is sought to re-enact it with certain small modifications including some changes in the preferential rate of Customs Duty allowed to licensees under the Law. 37) Hotels Aid Regulations, 1976 38) The Hotel Aid (Amendment) Law, 1978 (Law 4 of 1978). A law to amend the Hotels Aid Law, 1976 (Law 6 of 1976) 39) The Hotels Aid (Amendment) Law, 1979. (Law 2 of 1979) A law to amend the hotels Aid L aw, 1976 (Law 6 of 1976) DOMINICA Hotel Aids Ordinance, 1958. Ch. 321. On Ordinance to encourage the hotel industry in Dominica by granting certain elief in respect of customs duties, income tax, and real property tax to persons who expend moneys upon the construction or equipment of hotels in Dominica and for purposes incidental thereto and connected therewith. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Informe Aplicable a las Tiendas de Zonas Francas, Ley No. 4315 (Law relating to the shops in the Free Zones, Law No. 4315) GRENADA Beach Vending (Regulation) Act, 1998. (Act No. 21 of 1988). An Act to regulate beach vending and to provide for matters connected therewith. Also provides for the prohibition of harassment. Tourist Board Act, 1988 (Act No. 9 of 1988). An Act to establish a Tourist Board charged with the duty of developing the tourist industry of Grenada, Cariacou Petit Martinique and promoting its efficiency for the purposes incidental to or connected with the matters aforesaid. Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1990. (No. 20 of 1990). An Act to amend the Tourist Board Act 1988. Cruise Ship (Visitors Levy) (Amendment) Act, 1991. (Act No. 32 of 1991). An Act to provide for an increase in the levy on cruise ship visitors. Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1992. (No. 20 of 1992) An Act to amend the Tourist Board Act, 1988. Deals with the appointment and remuneration of Director, Deputy Director and Secretary of Tourist Board. Tourist Board (Amendment) Act 1993 (Act No. 39 of 1993). An Act to amend the Tourist Board Act, 1988. Deals with the appointment of beach patrol guards. JAMAICA The Hawkers and Pedlars Act. Cap. 146. [15th October, 1867]. Deals with the licensing of hawkers and pedlars and related matters. The Tourist Board Act, 1955. Incorporates subsequent amendments. Provides for the establishment and composition of Board, functions, duties and powers, financial provisions and miscellaneous related matters. The Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1985 (No. 7 of 1985). Amends a number of sections of the principal Act, notably in respect of licensing of tourist accommodation and the procedure to be followed. The Tourist (Duty-Free) Shopping System Act, 1974. Incorporates subsequent amendments up to 1985. Provides for the licensing of tourist (duty-free) shop operators and related matters including the furnishing of a bond, the levying of operational charge, the making of returns and keeping of records, warehousing, and other matters related to the operation of a duty-free trade. Tourism Incentive Legislation. The Hotel (Incentives) Act 1968. MEXICO Ley Federal de Turismo, 1992 – (Federal Tourism Law). Gazetted on 31 December 1992. Text comprises five parts sub-divided into chapters and articles in Spanish. Provides for the development of tourism, in terms of the planning of tourism including priority development zones, the decentralisation of functions, the promotion and publicity of tourism, the National Tourism Fund, and operational aspects of the sector. Reglamento de la Ley Federal de Turismo, 1994 – (Regulations under the Federal Tourism Law). First gazetted on 2 May 1994. Text comprises 15 chapters and 90 articles in Spanish. Provides for the regulation of tourism development zones, tourist accommodation establishments, food and beverage services, travel and tour services, tourist guides, etc. Reglamento Interior de la Secretaria de Turismo, 1996 – (Internal Regulations of the Secretariat of Tourism) Gazetted 31 May 1996. Text comprises 9 chapters and 30 articles in Spanish. Prescribes the role and functions of the various structural components of the Secretariat. MONTSERRAT Tourist Board Ordinance, 1993. (No. 3 0f 1993) An Ordinance to establish a Tourist Board for Montserrat to develop the tourist industry and promote its efficiency and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. PUERTO RICO Puerto Rico Games of Chance Regulations, 1997. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Tourism Company. Issued under the authority conferred by primary legislation, notably the Organic Act of the Tourism Company, Act No. 10 of 18 June 1970, as amended, and the Games of Chance Act, Act No. 221 of 15 May 1948 and repeals previous regulations with respect to the Games of Chance Act. English text comprises 11 chapters governing, inter alia, the grant of franchise to operate a casino, operation of the casino (with sub-chapters devoted to individual games), gaming equipment, controls, employee licence, casino service industry licence and casino service industry employee licence, procedures for solution of controversies, distribution of slot machine revenues, etc. Amendments made to Section 2 of the Puerto Rico Tourism Company Law pertaining to Casinos, arcades (games of chance, slots, etc. ). 13th Legislative Assembly, Ordinary Session, Law No. 24. Approved 26 June 1997 In Spanish. Capitulo 5. Juegos de Azar. Chapter 5. [The] Gambling/Gaming Law) Ley de la Compania de Turismo de Puerto Rico. – Junio 18, 1970, Num. 10, p. 426 art. 1: Junio 3, 1976, Num. 141, p. 438, sec. 1, ef. Junio 3, 1976. (23 L. P. R. A. Sec. 671 et seq. Capitulo 39. Compa a de Turismo. (The Organic Law of the Puerto Rico Tourism Company. Spanish text. Deals with the establishment, organi sation, responsibilities, functions and powers of the Tourism Company and related matters. Desarrollo Turistico. Capitulo 151. (Chapter 151. Tourism Development) Spanish text of law providing for the establishment and operation of tourism investment funds. Reglamento Promulgado para Gobernar las Condiciones para la Concession de Exenciones y Otros Incentivos Contributivos a Tenor con las Disdposiciones del Articulo 9(B) de la Ley de Desarrollo Turistico de Puerto Rico de 1993, segun Emendada, Ley Num. 78 de 10 de Septiembre de 1993, segun Emendada. (Regulations promulgated in 1995 under the Tourism Development Law of Puerto Rico, 1993, as amended, Law No. 78 of 1993, etc. Spanish text. Deals with wide range of tourism services, including â€Å"condohotels†, timeshare, golf courses, theme parks, marinas, and concessions and incentives provided etc. ) Ley de Derecho de Multipropiedad y Clubes Vacacionales de Puerto Rico. English language version available under title â€Å"Puerto Rico Timeshare and Vacation Club Act†. Law No. 252 Approved 26 December 1995. The objectives of the Act are (1) to protect the purchaser of timeshare interests and (2) to encourage the development of the timeshare industry by setting forth rules by which the industry is to operate. Enmienda al Reglamento de Requisitos Minimos de Hospederias y Paradores de Puerto Rico. (Amendments to the Regulations of Minimum Requirements for Guesthouses and Inns in Puerto Rico). Number 5533. Approved 14 January 1997. In Spanish. ST. LUCIA Tourist (Duty Free Shopping System) Act, 1986. (No 23 of 1986) An Act to provide for a tourist duty free shopping system permitting duty concessions on goods for export and for matters incidental thereto or connected therewith. Parks and Beaches Commission Act,1983 An Act to provide for the control and maintenance and development of the public parks, gardens and beaches of Saint Lucia. Provides for the establishment and functions of the Parks and Beaches Commission and miscellaneous related matters. Tourist (Duty-Free Shopping System) (Amendment) Order, 1996. Fiscal Incentives Act, 1974. No. (15 of 1974) An Act to give effect to the Agreement on harmonisation of fiscal incentives to industry. Hotel Aids Ordinance, 1959. (No. 25 of 1959) Hotel Proprietors Act, 1968. Tourist Industry Development Act, 1981. (No. 4 of 1981) An Act to provide for the establishment of a Board for the purposes of administering and developing the Tourist Industry of St Lucia and for purposes connected therewith. Provides for the establishment, composition, powers and duties, and operating procedures of the Board. ST. VINCENT THE GRENADINES Companies Regulations, 1996. S. R. O. No. 22 of 1996). Made under section 527 of the Companies Act, 1994. Customs Duties (Amendment) Act, 1997. (No. 5 of 1997). An Act to amend the Customs Duties Act (Cap. 184 of 1926), with which it should be read and construed as one. Forest Resource Conservation Act, 1992. (Act No. 47 of 1992). An Act to make provision for the conservation, management and proper use of the forests and water sheds, the declaration of forest reserves, cooperative forests and conservation areas, the prevention and control of forest fires; and for matters connected with those purposes. Immigration (Restriction) Act. Revised Edition 1990. Chapter 78. An Act to impose restrictions on immigration. Immigration (Passport Exemption) Regulations. Revised Edition 1990. Preservation of Historic Buildings and Antiquities Act, 1976. Revised Edition 1990. Ch. 247. An Act to make provision for the acquisition and preservation of historic buildings and antiquities, to restrict the exportation of antiquities, and for matters incidental to the foregoing. Aliens (Land-Holding Regulation) Act, 1922. Revised Edition 1990. Ch. 235. An Act to regulate the holding of land by aliens and companies under alien control. Sir Garfield Sobers (Land-Holding) Declaration Order, 1974. (S. R. O. No. 9 of 1974). Revised Edition 1990. Order waiving alien status of Sir Garfield Sobers for the purposes of the Aliens (Land Holding Regulation) Act. Botanical Garden Act, 1898. Revised Edition 1990. Ch. 56. An Act to authorise the framing of rules for the proper regulation of the Botanical Garden. Botanical Garden Rules, 1919. Revised Edition 1990. The Hotel Aid Act, 1988. (No. 16 of 1988). An Act to provide incentives for the renovation, refurbishment and expansion of existing hotels, the construction of new hotels and for matters incidental thereto and connected therewith. National Trust Act. Revised Edition 1990. Chapter 329. An Act to establish a body corporate to be known as the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines National Trust. Sets out objects, powers, composition of board of trustees, membership of Trust, publication of rules, and makes provision for relief from income tax on gifts to Trust. Hotel Tax Act, 1976. Revised Edition 1990. Ch. 38. An Act to provide for the imposition and collection of a tax in respect of the hire and occupation of accommodation and the supply of refreshment in hotels and for matters connected therewith. Mustique Company Limited Act, 1989. ( No. 62 of 1989). An Act to authorise the making of an agreement on the 15th day of Dec 1989 with the Mustique Company Limited for the establishment of the investment of Mustique as a first class inte rnational residential resort of distinctive character and the development of its commercial and other undertakings on the island. Mustique Company Limited Act. Act No. 62 of 1989. Revised Edition 1990. Ch. 108. An Act to authorise the making of an agreement on the 15th day of December 1989, with the Mustique Company Limited for the establishment of the Mustique Conservation Area, the further development through foreign investment of Mustique as a first class international residential resort of distinctive character and the development of its commercial and other undertakings on the island. Canouan Resorts Development Limited (Lease Ratification) Act, 1990. (No. 4 of 1990). An Act to confirm and ratify a lease agreement dated the 31st day of October 1990, between the Canouan Resorts Development Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Gesfid S. A. in respect of lands in Canouan for the construction and operation of an international residential resort and club of distinctive character. Town and Country Planning (Small Hotels and Self-Contained Apartments) Regulations, 1989. (S. R. O. No. 37 of 1989). Made under section 22 of the Town and Country Planning Act No. 8 of 1976 and its amendments Act No. 1 of 1981. Provides for minimum physical planning standards for small hotels and self-contained apartments, including site planning and environmental health standards. Hotels Aid (Application Procedure) Regulations, 1989. (S. R. O. No. 31 of 1989) Made under section 15 of the Hotels Aid Act, 1988 (No. 16 of 1988). Prescribes the procedure for registration of hotels under the Act for the purposes of construction, improvement and expansion approvals. Hotels Aid (Inventory) Regulations, 1972. (No. 5 of 1972). Made under the Hotels Aid Ordinance, 1969. Prescribes that certain licensed hotels are required to make, keep and maintain inventories. Gambling, Lotteries and Betting Ordinance, 1968. (No. 27 of 1968). Provides for establishment of Gaming Authority, and the operation and governance of gambling, lotteries, and betting, including appropriate licensing requirements, and other related matters. Gambling and Betting (Licences) Regulations, 1969. (S. R. O. No 1 of 1969). Made under the Gambling, Lotteries and Betting Ordinance, 1968. Hotels Aid Ordinance, 1969. (No. 24 of 1969). An Ordinance to provide incentives for hotel development and to regulate other matters connected therewith. Licences Ordinance, 1969. (No. 6 of 1969). An Ordinance to repeal the Licences Ordinance, 1940, and make fresh provision in replacement thereof. Hotels Aid (Customs Duty Concessions) Regulations, 1972. S. R. O. No. 4 of 1972. Made under the Hotels Aid Ordinance, 1969. Prescribes drawback of customs duties and the goods to which the concessions apply. Airport Service Charge Act, 1976. (No. 26 of 1976). An Act to impose an airport service charg e on passengers departing by aircraft from St. Vincent to make provision for the collection of such a charge, and matters in connection therewith. Yachts License (Amendment) Act, 1979. No. 1 of 1979). An Act to amend the Yachts Licence Act, 1970. Beach Protection Act, 1981. Act No. 10 of 1981 An Act to protect beaches and to prohibit the removal of sand, coral, stones, shingle and gravel from the beaches of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Beach Protection (Amendment) Act, 1982. (Act No. 23 of 1982) An Act to amend the Beach Protection Act, 1981. TRINIDAD TOBAGO Qualifications for the issue of licences to Tour Guides Tour Operators in Tobago. Draft Guide licence No. 51 of 1980. Statutory Instrument issued under the Summary Offences Law, Ch. 11:02. Minimum Requirements for Registration of Guesthouses. Issued by the Trinidad and Tobago Tourism Authority and the Tobago House of Assembly pursuant to Section 16B of the Tourism Development Authority Act, 1989. 3) Minimum Requirements for Registration of Hotels. Issued by the Trinidad and Tobago Tourism Authority and the Tobago House of Assembly pursuant to Section 16B of the Tourism Development Authority Act, 1989. TURKS CAICOS ISLANDS The Tourism Ordinance 1990. (No. 27 of 1990). An Ordinance to regulate tourism, to establish a Tourist Board and for connected purposes. The Tourism (Amendment) Ordinance 1995. No. 4 of 1995). Enacted to amend section 7 of the Tourism Ordinance 1990. The Tourist Board Ordinance, 1970. (No. 10 of 1970). An Ordinance to provide for the establishment of a Tourist Board charged with the duty of developing the tourist industry in the islands and for matters connected therewith. The Tourism Ordinance, 1993. Draft bill text available. An Ordinance to repeal and replace in an amended form the Tourism Ordinance 1990; to provide for the licensing and regulation of tourism businesses; and for matters connected therewith. 5) Coast Protection Ordinance, 1970. (No. 1. of 1970). An Ordinance to provide for the protection of the coasts of the islands. 6) The Encouragement of Development Ordinance, 1972. (No. 2 of 1972). An Ordinance to encourage the establishment, conduct and expansion of development enterprises in the islands by the granting of relief from customs duties and taxes to persons engaging in such enterprises incidental to and connected with any of the foregoing purposes. 7) The Encouragement of Development (Amendment) Ordinance 1980. (No. 8 of 1980). An Ordinance to amend the Encouragement of Development Ordinance, 1972 (No. 2 of 1972). Historic Wrecks Ordinance, 1974. No. 15 of 1974). An Ordinance to provide for the protection of wrecks in certain cases and for purposes connected therewith. National Parks Ordinance, 1975. (No. 11 of 1975). An Ordinance to provide powers to permit the establishment of parks, nature reserves, sanctuaries and areas of historical interest, and generally for the conservation of he natural environment and ecology of t he islands and for purposes connected therewith. Public Health, 1976. (No. 6. of 1976). An Ordinance relating to public health and to provide for matters incidental thereto. Towns and Public Health Ordinance, 1896. Revised Edition 1970. Ch. 49. Control of Drugs (Amendment Ordinance), 1980. UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS 1) Act No. 5036 of 1984. To authorise the Department of Conservation and Cultural Affairs to administer and enforce provisions relating to the mooring of vessels and the issuance of mooring permits. 2)Mooring and Anchoring of Vessels and Houseboats Act of 1990. Act No. 5567. To repeal chapter 16 of title 25, Virgin Islands Code, pertaining to the mooring and anchoring of vessels. 3)Coastal Zone Management: Proposed regulations, Administrative Processing fees for CZM Permit. Section 910. 1990] 4)*Revolving/Advertising Fund Bill. Bill No. 21-011. Act No. 6092. 5)*Cruise Ship Industry. Bill No. 23-0178 Act No. 6287 6)*The Casino Control Act of 1995. Bill No. 21-0003. II. LISTING BY SUBJECT AREA 1. INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK OF TOURISM Anguilla 1) The Anguilla Tourist Board Ordinance 1993 Bahamas 1) The Hotel Corporation of the Bahamas Act, 1974 Barbados 1) Barbados Tourism Authority Act , 1993 2) Barbados Tourism Authority Act, 1995 3) National Conservation Commission Act, 1982 4) Barbados Investment Development Corporation Act, 1992 British Virgin Islands 1Tourist Board Ordinance, 1969, Ch. 80 Cayman Islands 2The Tourism Law, 1974 Grenada 1)Tourist Board Act,1988 2)Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1990. (No. 20 of 1990). 3)Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1992 4)Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1993 Jamaica 1) The Tourist Board Act, 1955 2) The Tourist Board Amendment Act, 1985 Mexico 5)Ley Federal de Turismo,199 6)Reglamento de la Ley Federal de Turismo, 1994 7)Reglamento Interior de la Secretaria de Turismo, 1996 Monserrat 1) Tourist Board Ordinance, 1993. ( No. 13 of 1993) Puerto Rico 1)Ley de la Compania de Turismo de Puerto Rico, 1970 2)Desarrollo Turistico, Ch. 151 St Lucia )Parks and Beaches Commission Act, 1983 2)Tourist Industry Development Act, 1981 St Vincent and the Grenadines 1)National Trust Act. Revised edition, 1990. 2)Mustique Company Limited Act, 1989 3)Mustique Company Limited Act. Revised edition 1990 4)Canouan Resorts Development Limited (Lease Ratification) Act, 1990 Turks and Caicos Islands 1)The Tourism Ordinance, 1990 2)The Tourism (Amendment) Ordinance, 1995 3)The Tourist Board Ordinance, 1970 4)The Tourism Ordinance, 1993 2. TOURIST ACCOMMODATION ESTABLISHMENTS Anguilla 1)Accommodation Tax Ordinance, 1973 2)The Accommodation Tax (Amendment) Ordinance, 1985 Aruba )National Ordinance for the Promotion of Industrial Establishments and Hotel Construction, 1953. Bahamas 1)The Hotels Encouragement Act, 1954 2)The Hotels Encouragement (Amendment) Act, 1965 3)The Hotels Act, 1970 4)The Hotels Encouragement Regulations, 1971. Supplement 5)The Hotels Regulations, 1971 Barbados 1)Hotels Apartments and Guest Houses (Registration and Classification) Regulations, 1982 2)The Hotel Aids Act, 1967 3)Hotel Proprietors Act, 1975 4)Hotel and Restaurant (Sales Tax) Act, 1974 5)The Hotel and restaurants (Rate of Tax) Order, 1977 6)Condominium Act, 1971 Belize 1)Hotels and Tourist Accommodation Act, 1997 )Hotels and Tourist Accommodation (Minimum Registration, Licensing and Operating Requirements) Regulations, 1999 Bermuda 1) The Hotel (Licensing and Control) Regulations, 1976 Cayman Islands 1)The Tourist Accommodation (Taxation) Law (Revised), 1978 2)The Tourist Accommodation (Taxation) (Amendment) Law, 1981 3)Tourism Regulations, 1974 4)Tourism (Amendment) Regulations, 1985 5) The Tourism (Amendment) Law, 1979 6) Hotels Aid Law, 1976 1)Hotels Aid Regulations, 1976 2)The Hotel Aid (Amendment) Law, 1978 3)The Hotels Aid (Amendment) Law, 1979 Dominica 1)Hotel Aids Ordinance, 1958 Jamaica 1)The Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1985 Mexico 1)Reglamento de la Ley Federal de Turismo Puerto Rico 1)Reglamento Promulgado para Gobernar las Condiciones para la Concession de Exenciones Otros Incentivos Contributivos a Tenor con las Disposiciones del Articula 9(B) de la Ley de Desarrollo Turistico de Puerto Rico de 1993 2)Puerto Rico Timeshare and Vacation Club Act, 1995 3)Enmienda al Reglamento de Requisitos Minimos de Hospederias y Paradores de Puerto Rico, 1997 St Lucia 1)Hotel Aids Ordinance, 1959 2)Hotel Proprietors Act, 1968 St Vincent and the Grenadines 1)The Hotel Aid Act, 1988 2)Hotels Aid (Application Procedure) Regulations, 1989 )Hotels Aid (Inventory) Regulations, 1989 4)Hotels Aid Ordinance, 1969 5)Hotels Aid (Customs Duty Concessions) Regulations, 1972 Trinidad and Tobago 1)Minimum Requirements for Registration of Guesthouses 2)Minimum Requirements for Registration of Hotels 3) 4)DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVES Aruba 1)National Ordinance for the Promotion of Industrial Establishments and Hotel Construction, 1953 Bah amas 1)The Promotion of Tourism Act, No. 49 of 1963. Chapter 13. Revised Edition 1965. 2)The Hotels Encouragement Act, 1954, with subsequent amendments. Chapter 304. 3)The Hotels Encouragement (Amendment) Act, 1965. No. 59 of 1965. )The Hotels Encouragement (Amendment) Act. No. 5 of 1966. 5)The Hotels Encouragement Regulations, 1971. Supplement. 6) Cruise Sips (Overnighting Incentives) Act, 1995. Barbados 1)Hotel Aids Act 1967 2)Suggested Minimum Requirements for the Granting of Concessions to Hotels/Guesthouses. Issued by the National Development Corporation under the Hotel Aid Act. British Virgin Islands 1)Commercial Recreational Vessels Licensing Act, 1992 Cayman Islands 1)Hotels Aid Law, 1976 2)Hotels Aid Regulations, 1976 3)Hotels Aid (Amendment) Law, 1978 4)Hotels Aid (Amendment) Law, 1979 Dominica 1)Hotel Aids Ordinance, 1958 Jamaica )The Hotel (Incentives) Act, 1968 Mexico 1)Ley Federal de Turismo, 1992 2)Reglamento de la Ley Federal de Turismo, 1994 Puerto Rico 1)Desarrollo Turistico. Capitulo 151 2) Reglamento Promulgado para Gobernar las Condiciones para la Concession de Exenciones y Otros Incentivos Contributivos a Tenor con las Dispsiciones del Articulo 9(B) de la Ley de Desarrollo Turistico de Puerto Rico de 1993 St Lucia 1)Fiscal Incentives Act, 1968 2)Hotel Aids Ordinance, 1959 3)Tourist Industry Development Act, 1981 St Vincent and the Grenadines 1)The Hotel Aid Act, 1988 2) Mustique Company Limited Act, 1989 3) Mustique Company Limited Act. Revised edition 1990 4) Canouan Resorts Development Limited (Lease ratification) Act, 1990 5) Hotels Aid (Application Procedure) Regulations, 1989 6) Hotels Aid (Inventory) Regulations, 1972 7) Hotels Aid Ordinance, 1969 8) Hotels Aid (Customs Duty Concessions) Regulations, 1972 Turks and Caicos Islands 1)The Encouragement of Development Ordinance, 1972 2) The Encouragement of Development (Amendment) Ordinance, 1980 3. REGULATION AND CONTROL OF TOURISM INDUSTRY Bahamas 1)The Hotels Act, 1970. 2) The Hotels Regulations, 1971. S. I. No. 8 of 1971. 3) The Water Skiing and Motor Boat Control Act, 1970. No. 16 of 1970. 4) The Lotteries and Gaming Act, 1969. No. 8 of 1969. 5) The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1971. No. 1 of 1971. 6) The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1972. No. 2 of 1972. 7) The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1974. No. 13 of 1974. 8) The Lotteries and Gaming (Amendment) Act, 1978. No. 3 of 1978. Barbados 1)Hotels, Apartments and Guest Houses (Registration and Classification) Regulations, 1982. S. I. 1982 No. 160 2) Hotel Proprietors Act, 1975. Ch. 309. 3) Health Services Act, 1969. Ch. 44. 4) Health Services (Food Hygiene) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. ) Health Services (Hotels) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 6) Health Services (Restaurants) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 7) Health Services (Building) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 8) Health Services (Lodging Houses and Barracks) Regulations, 1970. Ch. 44. 9) Health Services (Swimming Pools) Regulations, 1970. Ch.. 44. 10)Health Services (Amendment) Act, 1995-4. 11)Minor Offences Act, 1998-1. 12)Travel Services Act, 1983. Ch. 373A. 13)Travel Services (Fees) Order, 1983. Ch. 373A. 14)Travel Services Regulations, 1983. 15) Barbados Port Authority (Water Sports) Regulations, 1990 16) Condominium Act, 1971. Ch. 224A 17) Registration of Business Names Act, 140. Ch.. 317. 18) Profession, Trade and Business Registration Act, 1979. Ch. 373. 19) Profession, Trade and Business Registration Order, 1992. Belize 1) Belize Tourist Board (Tourist Guide) Regulations, 1992. Statutory Instrument No. 130 of 1992. 2) Belize Tourist Board (Tour Guide) Regulations, 1994. Statutory Instrument No. 80 of 1994 3) Hotels and Tourist Accommodation Act, 1997. No. 12 of 1997. 4) Hotels and Tourist Accommodation (Minimum Registration, Licensing and Operating Requirements) Regulations, 1999. ) 1st Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Hotels and Resorts b) 2nd Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Apartments, Condominiums Villas c) 3rd Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Guest Houses, Lodges and Inns d) 4th Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Community Based Tourism Establishments e) 5th Schedule: Minimum Requirements for the Registration of Camp Sites 5)Belize Tourist Board, Agreement for Operating a Liveaboard Passenger Vessel (Class II- Vessels ten (10) and above and above passenger capacity). Bermuda 1)The Motor Taxi Regulations, 1952 2)The Auxiliary Bicycles Act, 1954 3)The Hotel (Licensing and Control) Regulations, 1976 4)The Motor Car Act 1951. Parts II and IV Cayman Islands 1)Tourism Regulations (1999 Revision). 2)The Tourism Law, 1974. Law 10 0f 1974 3)Tourism Regulations, 1974. 4)Tourism (Amendment) Regulations , 1985 5)The Tourism (Amendment) Law, 1979 (Law 3 of 1979) 6)Marine Conservation (Licensing of Spear Guns) Directives, 1986. Dominican Republic 1)Informe Aplicable a las Tiendas de Zonas Francas, Ley No. 4315 (Law relating to the shops in the Free Zones, Law No. 4315) Grenada ) Beach Vending (Regulation) Act, 1998. (Act No. 21 of 1988). 2) Tourist Board (Amendment) Act 1993 (Act No. 39 of 1993). Jamaica 1)The Hawkers and Pedlars Act. Cap. 146. [15th October, 1867]. 2)The Tourist Board (Amendment) Act, 1985 (No. 7 of 1985). 3)The Tourist (Duty-Free) Shopping System Act, 1974. Puerto Rico 1)Puerto Rico Games of Chance Regulations, 1997. Commonwealth of Puerto R ico Tourism Company. Amendments made to Section 2 of the Puerto Rico Tourism Company Law pertaining to Casinos, arcades (games of chance, slots, etc. ). 13th Legislative Assembly, Ordinary Session, Law No. 24. Approved 26 June 1999. In Spanish 2)Capitulo 5. Juegos de Azar. (Chapter 5. [The] Gambling/Gaming Law) 3)Reglamento Promulgado para Gobernar las Condiciones para la Concession de Exenciones y Otros Incentivos Contributivos a Tenor con las Disdposiciones del Articulo 9(B) de la Ley de Desarrollo Turistico de Puerto Rico de 1993, segun Emendada, Ley Num. 78 de 10 de Septiembre de 1993, segun Emendada. 4)Ley de Derecho de Multipropiedad y Clubes Vacacionales de Puerto Rico. 5) English language version available under title â€Å"Puerto Rico Timeshare and Vacation Club Act†. Law No. 252 Approved 26 December 1995. 6) Enmienda al Reglamento de Requisitos Minimos de Hospederias y Paradores de Puerto Rico. (Amendments to the Regulations of Minimum Requirements for Guesthouses and Inns in Puerto Rico). Number 5533. Approved 14 January 1997. In Spanish. St Lucia 1) Tourist (Duty Free Shopping System) Act, 1986. (No 23 of 1986) 2) Parks and Beaches Commission Act,1983 3) Tourist (Duty-Free Shopping System) (Amendment) Order, 1996. 4) Hotel Proprietors Act, 1968. St Vincent and the Grenadines 1)Companies Regulations, 1996. (S. R. O. No. 2 of 1996). 2) Customs Duties (Amendment) Act, 1997. (No. 5 of 1997). 3 Immigration (Restriction) Act. Revised Edition 1990. Chapter 78. 4) Immigration (Passport Exemption) Regulations. Revised Edition 1990. 5) Aliens (Land-Holding Regulation) Act, 1922. Revised Edition 1990. Ch. 235. 6) Sir Garfield Sobers (Land-Holding) Declaration Order, 1974. (S. R. O. No. 9 of 1974). Revised Edition 1990. 7)Gambling, Lotteries and Betting Or dinance, 1968. (No. 27 of 1968). 8) Gambling and Betting (Licences) Regulations, 1969. (S. R. O. No 1 of 1969). 9) Licences Ordinance, 1969. (No. 26 of 1969). 0)Yachts License (Amendment) Act, 1979. (No. 1 of 1979). Trinidad and Tobago 1)Qualifications for the issue of licenses to Tour Guides Tour Operators in Tobago. Draft. Guide licence No. 51 of 1980. Statutory Instrument issued under the Summary Offences Law, Ch. 11:02. 2) Minimum Requirements for Registration of Guesthouses. 2)Minimum Requirements for Registration of Hotels. Turks and Caicos Islands 1) The Tourism Ordinance 1990. (No. 27 of 1990). 2) The Tourism (Amendment) Ordinance 1995. (No. 4 of 1995). 3) The Tourism Ordinance, 1993. United States Virgin Islands 1)Act No. 036 of 1984. To authorise the Department of Conservation and Cultural Affairs to administer and enforce provisions relating to the mooring of vessels and the issuance of mooring permits. 2)Mooring and Anchoring of Vessels and Houseboats Act of 1990. Act N o. 5567. 5. TOURISM TAXATION Anguilla 1) Accommodation Tax Ordinance, No7 of 1973. 2) The Accommodation Tax (Amendment) Ordinance No. 1 of 1985. Bahamas 1) The Hotels Act, 1970. Barbados 1)Hotel and Restaurants (Sales Tax) Act, 1974. 2)The Hotel and Restaurants (Rate of Tax) Order, 1977. 3)Hotels and Restaurants (Sales Tax) Amendment Act, 1978. )Hotels and Restaurants (Sales Tax) (Amendment Act), 1980. Cayman Islands 1) The Travel Tax Law, 1976 (Law 11 of 1976) 2) The Travel Tax Regulations, 1977. 3)The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1979 (Law 32 of 1979) 4)The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1982 (Law 6 of 1982) 5)The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1984 (Law 14 of 1984) 6)The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1985 (Law 39 of 1985) 7)The Travel Tax (Amendment) Law, 1987 (Law 5 of 1987) 8)The Tourist Accommodation (Taxation) Law (Revised) [1978] 9)The Tourist Accommodation (Taxation) (Amendment) Law, 1981 (Law 25 of 1981) Grenada 1)Cruise Ship (Visitors Levy) (Amendment) Act, 1991. Act No. 32 of 199 1). St Vincent and the Grenadines 1)Hotel Tax Act, 1976. Revised Edition 1990. Ch. 338. 2)Airport Service Charge Act, 1976. (No. 26 of 1976). 6. TOURISM AND ENVIRONMENT Barbados 1) Health Services Act, 1969. Ch. 44. 2) Health Services (Food Hygiene) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 3)Health Services (Hotels) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 4)Health Services (Restaurants) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 5)Health Services (Building) Regulations, 1969. Ch. 44. 6)Health Services (Lodging Houses and Barracks) Regulations, 1970. Ch. 44. 7)Health Services (Swimming Pools) Regulations, 1970. Ch.. 44. 8)Health Services (Amendment) Act, 1995-4. 9)National Conservation Commission Act, 1982. Ch. 393. 10)Beach Protection Act, 1890. Ch. 389. 11)Cultivation of Trees Act, 1951. Ch. 390. 12)Marine Areas (Preservation and Enhancement) Act, 1976. Ch. 392. 13)Wild Birds Protection Act, 1907. Ch. 398. Belize 1) Belize Tourist Board, Environmental Compliance Plan for Liveaboard Passenger Vessels (Class II). Bermuda 1)The Summary Offences Act, 1926. 1926: No. 2 Cayman Islands 1) Strata Titles Registration Law, 1973 (Law 14 of 1973) 2)Strata Titles Registration Regulations, 1974. )The Strata Titles Registration (Amendment) Law, 1983 (Law 1 of 1983) 4) The Mosquito (Research and Control) Law (Revised) [1976] 5)The Mosquito (Research and Control) Regulations (Revised), 1976 6)The Mosquito (Research and Control) (Amendment) Regulations, 1979 7) Declaration of Physical Control Area (Mosquito (Research and Control) Law (Revised) [1979] 8) The Mosquito (Research and Control) (Amendment) Regul ations, 1981 The Marine Conservation Law, 1978 (Law 19 of 1978) The Marine Conservation Regulations, 1979 Marine Conservation (Amendment) Regulations, 1980 The Marine Conservation (Turtle Protection) Regulations, 1978 Marine Conservation (Amendment) Regulations, 1985. Marine Conservation (Turtle Protection) (Amendment) Regulations, 1985. The Marine Conservation (Amendment) Law, 1985 (Law 5 of 1985). Marine Conservation (Amendment) Regulations, 1986. The Marine Conservation (Marine Parks) Regulations, 1986 The Marine Conservation (Marine Parks) (Amendment) Regulations, 1986. Marine Conservation (Licensing of Seine Nets) Directives, 1986. Marine Conservation (Licensing of Spear Guns) Directives, 1986. The Litter Law, 1982 (Law 2 of 1982) St Lucia How to cite Azzzz, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

Lusus Naturae by Margaret Atwood Essay Example

Lusus Naturae by Margaret Atwood Paper Lusus Naturae is about a young girl, who around when she was seven, began morphing into a beastly freak of nature. The condition left her with yellow eyes, pink teeth, red fingernails, and long dark fur. She drank blood and her voice translated words to growls. Being a freak, she became a burden to her family who was doing well before she underwent these changes. To protect her and to clear their name from being the household with the beast girl, they faked her death but kept her locked in her room. She â€Å"died† in a saintly way, covered in white and praised for dying a virgin. After her death, her sister was able to get married and her mother stayed home to take care of her. Being thought of as dead, she found peace and solitude especially at night when she was able to roam freely. She found excitement in scaring children and people in windows. She was not bitter about being an embarrassment or â€Å"curse† on her family. She was very cooperative and gracefully followed through with the plans so far. Eventually, her father and grandmother died and her mother moved in with her sister’s family. A new family moved into her house, but she quickly scared them out and lived there on her own. Her secret life came to an end when she witnessed a couple having an affair in a meadow. Ignorant to what was happening, she became curious and wanted to join in. After the girl had left, she approached the sleeping man and bit him on the neck. She had meant for it to be a kiss. The village heard about it, inspected her empty coffin, and came after her. She decided to kill herself before they could get their hands on her. She planned to put on her white veils and throw herself off of her burning rooftop. While on the run she fantasizes about what she’ll be thought of as after she dies and what she’ll look like in heaven. She thinks of how great it would be if she and the angels looked the same. We will write a custom essay sample on Lusus Naturae by Margaret Atwood specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Lusus Naturae by Margaret Atwood specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Lusus Naturae by Margaret Atwood specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer This story well illustrates what it is like to b

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Apple Computers essays

Apple Computers essays One of the most innovative and exciting fields in our current society is the PC industry. In the last thirty years, the computer industry has developed at an astounding rate-nearly two out of three people over the age of 18 in the US either own or have access to a computer on a regular basis. This incredible invention, however, is the result of inauspicious beginnings and inept primary marketing by one of the most successful manufacturers of personal computers-Apple. Despite disastrous losses in the 80s and 90s to their main competitor, IBM, Apple recently re-vamped the entire company-focusing on marketing and product developmentand introduced the iMac in 1998-the most successful personal computer launch ever. Despite this success, the rapid rate of development within the computer industry indicates that Apple must analyze their previous marketing techniques in order to maintain the high level of success achieved in the late twentieth century. The PC was invented on April Fools Day in 1976. The two inventors, Steven Jobs and Stephan Wozniak, were working out of a garage and possessed very little knowledge of the importance of marketing in successful product production and distribution. They were primarily interested in their products-showing little concern for its markets. The introduction of IBM in 1981, however, was a strong wakeup call for the unprofessional company-forcing them into competition against strong and well-managed opponents. For several years after IBM launched its first PC, it dominated the market-focusing on a synergistic relationship with Microsoft. After hearing the dire predictions regarding the probability of Apple surviving IBM domination, Steven Jobs realized that professional marketing help was vital. John Scully, a professional in marketing, concluded that Apple desperately needed a keen update on its marketing-product strategies. The resulting solution consisted of diffe...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Operation Cobra in World War II

Operation Cobra in World War II Operation Cobra was conducted from July 25 to 31, 1944, during World War II (1939-1945). After the Allied landings in Normandy, commanders began to formulate a plan to push out from the beachhead. Initial efforts were hampered by the need to take the city of Caen in the east and the dense hedgerow country in the west. Seeking to launch a major breakout, General Omar Bradley sought to focus the Allies efforts on a narrow front west of St. Là ´. Moving forward on July 25 after the area had been heavy bombed, American troops achieved a breakthrough. By the third day, most organized German resistance had been overcome and the speed of the advance increased. Coupled with assaults by British and Canadian forces, Operation Cobra led to the collapse of the German position in Normandy. Background Landing in Normandy on D-Day (June 6, 1944), Allied forces quickly consolidated their foothold in France. Pushing inland, American forces in the west encountered difficulty negotiating the bocage of Normandy. Hampered by this vast network of hedgerows, their advance was slow. As June passed, their greatest successes came on the Cotentin Peninsula where troops secured the key port of Cherbourg. To the east, British and Canadian forces fared little better as they sought to capture the city of Caen. Grappling with the Germans, the Allied efforts around the city succeeded drawing the bulk of the enemy armor to that sector (Map). Eager to break the deadlock and begin mobile warfare, Allied leaders began planning for a breakout from the Normandy beachhead. On July 10, following the capture of the northern part of Caen, the commander of the 21st Army Group, Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery, met with General Omar Bradley, commander of the US First Army, and Lieutenant General Sir Miles Dempsey, commander of the British Second Army, to discuss their options. Admitting progress was slow on his front, Bradley put forward a breakout plan dubbed Operation Cobra which he hoped to launch on July 18. Lt. Gen. Omar Bradley (center) with Lt. General George S. Patton (left) and General Sir Bernard Montgomery (right) at 21st Army Group HQ, Normandy, 7 July 1944. Public Domain Planning Calling for a massive offensive to the west of Saint-Là ´, Operation Cobra was approved by Montgomery who also directed Dempsey to keep pressing around Caen to hold the German armor in place. To create the breakthrough, Bradley intended to focus the advance on a 7,000 yard stretch of the front south of the Saint-Là ´Ã¢â‚¬â€œPeriers Road. Prior to the attack an area measuring 6,000 Ãâ€" 2,200 yards would be subjected to heavy aerial bombardment. With the conclusion of the air strikes, the 9th and 30th Infantry Divisions from Major General J. Lawton Collins VII Corps would move forward opening a breach in the German lines. These units would then hold the flanks while the 1st Infantry and 2nd Armored Divisions drove through the gap. They were to be followed by a five or six division exploitation force. If successful, Operation Cobra would allow American forces to escape the bocage and cut off the Brittany peninsula. To support Operation Cobra, Dempsey commenced Operations Goodwood and Atlantic on July 18. Though these took substantial casualties, they succeeded in capturing the remainder of Caen and forced the Germans to retain seven of the nine panzer divisions in Normandy opposite the British. Armies Commanders Allies Field Marshal Bernard MontgomeryGeneral Omar Bradley11 divisions Germans Field Marshal Gunther von KlugeColonel General Paul Hausser8 divisions Moving Forward Though the British operations commenced on July 18, Bradley elected to delay several days due to poor weather over the battlefield. On July 24, Allied aircraft began striking the target area despite questionable weather. As a result, they accidentally inflicted around 150 friendly fire casualties. Operation Cobra finally moved forward the next morning with over 3,000 aircraft striking the front. Friendly fire continued to be an issue as the attacks inflicted a further 600 friendly fire casualties as well as killed Lieutenant General Leslie McNair (Map). Advancing around 11:00 AM, Lawtons men were slowed by surprisingly stiff German resistance and numerous strong points. Though they gained only 2,200 yards on July 25, the mood in the Allied high command remained optimistic and the 2nd Armored and 1st Infantry Divisions joined the assault the next day. They were further supported by VIII Corps which began attacking German positions to the west. Fighting remained heavy on the 26th but began to wane on the 27th as German forces began retreating in the face of the Allied advance (Map). Breaking Out Driving south, German resistance was scattered and American troops captured Coutances on July 28 though they endured heavy fighting east of the town. Seeking to stabilize the situation, the German commander, Field Marshal Gunther von Kluge, began directing reinforcements west. These were intercepted by XIX Corps which had begun advancing on VII Corps left. Encountering the 2nd and 116th Panzer Divisions, XIX Corps became embroiled in heavy combat, but succeeded in shielding the American advance to the west. German efforts were repeatedly frustrated by Allied fighter bombers which swarmed over the area. U.S. tanks pass through a wrecked street in Coutances, Normandy in their drive to the sea beyond the town. National Archives and Records Admininstration With the Americans advancing along the coast, Montgomery directed Dempsey to begin Operation Bluecoat which called for an advance from Caumont towards Vire. With this he sought to hold German armor in the east while protecting Cobras flank. As British forces rolled forward, American troops captured the key town of Avranches which opened the way into Brittany. The next day, XIX Corps succeeded in turning back the last German counterattacks against the American advance. Pressing south, Bradleys men finally succeeded in escaping the bocage and began to drive the Germans before them. Aftermath As Allied troops were enjoying success, changes took place in command structure. With the activation of Lieutenant General George S. Pattons Third Army, Bradley ascended to take over the newly-formed 12th Army Group. Lieutenant General Courtney Hodges assumed command of First Army. Entering combat, Third Army poured into Brittany as the Germans attempted to regroup. Though the German command saw no other sensible course than to withdraw behind the Seine, they were ordered to conduct a large counterattack at Mortain by Adolf Hitler. Dubbed Operation Luttich, the attack began on August 7 and was largely defeated within twenty-four hours (Map). Sweeping east, American troops captured Le Mans on August 8. With his position in Normandy collapsing rapidly, Kluges Seventh and Fifth Panzer Armies risked being trapped near Falaise. Beginning on August 14, Allied forces sought to close the Falaise Pocket and destroy the German Army in France. Though nearly 100,000 Germans escaped the pocket before it was closed on August 22, around 50,000 were captured and 10,000 killed. In addition, 344 tanks and armored vehicles, 2,447 trucks/vehicles, and 252 artillery pieces were captured or destroyed. Having won the Battle of Normandy, Allied forces advanced freely to the Seine River reaching it on August 25.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Utilizing Assessment Rubrics to Evaluate Learning Assignment

Utilizing Assessment Rubrics to Evaluate Learning - Assignment Example Using a rubric, students develop a clear sense of what is required of them on a given assignment. A rubric outlines details such as the length of the assignment, the content, which is important in directing students on what would be relevant or irrelevant if covered (Helvoort 2010, p.27). The rubric is also gives instructions on the referencing requirements. Perhaps the most important use of the rubric is its use as an instrument that defines the standards in every assignment (Hauser and Bowen, 2009). This is such that, by going through the rubric, the student is made aware of what they need to do to garner scores within the highest score brackets. The rubric outlines the way one has to arrange their thoughts in order come up with a paper that attracts good grades, the proper way to reference their work and the grammatical demands (Hauser and Bowen, 2009). In this, tutors are able to aid their students to grasp the standards of the profession (Oakleaf, 2008 p.245) in a concise manner. In addition, students can understand their grades by going through the rubric to discover costly omissions and commissions that marred their ability to score the grades they were aiming for. An effective rubric applies the use of the following three domains. The first, the affective domain, addresses the intersect between the values and beliefs of patients and nurses, and how these apply to the treatment regimen. Secondly is the cognitive domain, addressing the extent of knowledge of nurses. This domain has to do with analysis and application of what is known to the nurse. Finally is the psychomotor domain, addressing the technical skills at the nurse’s disposal (Cecilia, 2013). These domains have to be incorporated into the rubric as demonstrated. A good rubric, according to Oakleaf (2008, p.254) is in synchrony with the learning objectives of the course. This tests the retention and application abilities of the students, that is the cognitive skills of learners. In